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allom opening of London Bridge lge

Allom Thomas after T. Allom
The ceremony of Opening of London Bridge August 1 1831
Taken by especial permission of the London Bridge Committee
printed by Charles J. Hullmadel published by Fisher & Son & Chas. Tilt. London.
Original hand tinted stone Lithograph 8 x 12 ¼" French lines and wash mat, glazed, Hogarth frame 15 x 20"

Ref. GH88(149)/DAL/dn.andv >AVL           PRICE CODE B

View of the Royal procession promenading on the new London Bridge on the day of its opening; The procession of people walk south down the bridge, a large tented pavilion behind them, people lining the streets lowering or raising their hats, the procession led by King William IV of England (1765-1837) and Queen Adelaide (1792-1849); in foreground to right a group of men including guards and on the left a man waves his cap over the side of the bridge; the Monument and spire of St. Magnus church along with others and the Tower of London may be seen in the background. Work on the new London Bridge, to replace the existing bridge that was over 600 years old, began in 1825. The new bridge was designed by John Rennie, completed in 1831, had five semi-elliptical arches which enabled wider spans to be bridged with much greater stability. Other artists, including Clarkson Stanfield, captured 'the most splendid spectacle that has been witnessed on the Thames for many years'. The Times. Allom chose to capture the scene atop the bridge with the huge ceremonial pavilion that had been erected on the bridge, wherein a sumptuous banquet was held. The royal standard can be seen flying from the pavilion at the north end.
This bridge had to be replaced over 100 years later and it was sold to the American entrepreneur Robert P McCulloch in 1968. He had it dismantled, transported to the USA and reconstructed in Lake Havasu City, Arizona. The current London Bridge was opened by Queen Elizabeth II in 1973.

Thomas Allom (13 March 1804 – 21 October 1872) was an English architect, artist, and topographical illustrator. He was a founding member of what became the Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA).

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